Book Reviews · Fantasy · Wyrd And Wonder

Mini Review: The Unspoken Name by A.K. Larkwood

Today's prompt for Wyrd & Wonder is #TropeTuesday: With Friends Like These - enemy to ally or otherwise unreliable allies, and backstabbing best friends. This made me think of The Unspoken Name by A.K. Larkwood, which I read earlier this year and just hadn't gotten around to reviewing. This book features a great enemies to unreliable allies, and it certainly kept me on my toes, wondering who might mess up meticulous plans for the chance to gain the advantage over the other. This was just such a brilliant story, so without further preamble, here is why you should read The Unspoken Name.

Ramblings · Wyrd And Wonder

Wyrd & Wonder: Highly Anticipated Books

Day 17 of the Wyrd & Wonder prompt challenge is 'Can't Wait to Read' - books on your TBR or up and coming series. Given this, I thought I'd talk about some of the books that are coming out this year between June and December that I cannot wait to get my hands on! There may be some that I've mentioned a few times on the blog, but I haven't included any ARCs I've already read, even if their release date is June, and for those you can look back through my reviews! So, here are 21 fantasy books that I am really looking forward to for the rest of 2021:

Book Reviews · Fantasy

Review: The Wolf and the Woodsman by Ava Reid

In her forest-veiled pagan village, Évike is the only woman without power, making her an outcast clearly abandoned by the gods. When soldiers arrive from the Holy Order of Woodsmen to claim a pagan girl for the king's blood sacrifice, Évike is betrayed by her fellow villagers and surrendered. But when monsters attack the Woodsmen and their captive en route, slaughtering everyone but Évike and the cold, one-eyed captain, they have no choice but to rely on each other. Except he's no ordinary Woodsman - he's the disgraced prince, Gáspár Bárány, whose father needs pagan magic to consolidate his power. Gáspár fears that his cruelly zealous brother plans to seize the throne and instigate a violent reign that would damn the pagans and the Yehuli alike. As the son of a reviled foreign queen, Gáspár understands what it's like to be an outcast, and he and Évike make a tenuous pact to stop his brother. 

Book Reviews · Fantasy · Teen

Review: King of Scars by Leigh Bardugo

The people of Ravka don't know what Nikolai Lantsov endured in their bloody civil war and he intends to keep it that way. Yet each day a dark magic in him grows stronger, threatening to destroy all he has built. Zoya Nazyalensky has devoted her life to rebuilding the Grisha army. Despite their magical gifts, Zoya knows the Grisha cannot survive without Ravka as a place of sanctuary – and she will stop at nothing to help Nikolai secure the throne. Far north, Nina Zenik wages her own kind of war against the people who would see the Grisha destroyed. Burdened by grief and a terrifying power, Nina must face her past to have any hope of defeating the dangers that await her.

Ramblings · Wyrd And Wonder

Wyrd & Wonder: Desert Island Reads

IMAGE CREDIT: pegasus image by Svetlana Alyuk on 123RF.com This challenge was put together by imyril @ There's Always Room For One More and inspired by a BBC radio show, which I haven't actually ever listened to, but I still love the concept! You can see her post about it here, but essentially these are the rules: Eight books/audiobooks,… Continue reading Wyrd & Wonder: Desert Island Reads

Book Reviews · Fantasy

Review: For the Wolf by Hannah Whitten

As the only Second Daughter born in centuries, Red has one purpose - to be sacrificed to the Wolf in the Wood in the hope he'll return the world's captured gods. Red is almost relieved to go. Plagued by a dangerous power she can't control, at least she knows that in the Wilderwood, she can't hurt those she loves. Again. But the legends lie. The Wolf is a man, not a monster. Her magic is a calling, not a curse. And if she doesn't learn how to use it, the monsters the gods have become will swallow the Wilderwood - and her world - whole.

Book Reviews · Fantasy

Review: Sairō’s Claw by Virginia McClain

Torako has done many things to protect the valley that she calls home, but she’s never looted a corpse before. So when the katana she steals off the still-cooling body of a bandit turns out to be possessed by a grumpy wolf kami, she can only assume it’s because she’s somehow angered the spirits. An impression that’s only reinforced when she returns home to find her wife abducted and her daughter in hiding. But angry spirits or no, Torako isn't about to let bandits run off with the love of her life, even if it means taking their 3 year old on a rescue mission. In all Kaiyo's years as Captain of the Wind Serpent she has never once questioned her admiral’s orders. So when she receives the command to abduct a civilian scribe with the help of fifteen felons, she registers her objections, but does as she is bid. Yet, as the mission unfolds, Kaiyo finds herself questioning everything from her loyalties to her convictions. As Torako and Kaiyo’s fates cross like dueling blades, their persistence is matched only by their fury, until they uncover a series of truths they may never be ready to accept.